The Art of Slow Blogging.

galapagostortoisesmallAlthough I enjoy blogging, I have been experiencing blogging ‘burn-out’.  Between blogging, my studies and my writing, it has become a bit overwhelming.  This is why I have decided to join the ranks of the slow blogger.

Apparently, slow blogging has been around for a while.  I have only just discovered it, thanks to author Anne. R. Allen.  She wrote about The Slow Blog Manifesto and she makes some very convincing arguments on why writers should take it up.  The emphasis for slow blogging is on quality and not quantity.  This makes perfect sense, because as writers, our readers judge us by our content.  If we write something that grabs the readers’ attention, they’ll want to come back for more and this goes for our blog posts as well as our stories.  For the most part though, our time is better spent focusing on our stories.

Following my post on 5Ways to Bring back the Muse, I read another post by Anne about the overwhelmingly high expectations upon writers these days.  Once again, this is where slow blogging makes sense.  Time is important to readers and writers alike, and if you feel pressured into producing a high quantity of blog posts, not only will you as a writer feel burnt out, but readers will be inundated with too much in their inbox.

Other writers are beginning to explore slow blogging and questioning how often should fiction writers blog.  Author Jody Hedlund has also entered the debate on whether Blogging is a Time-Suck for Writers, and asking Do Agents and Editors Expect Novelists to Blog?

Blogging is a great way for writers to practice their art and connect with readers, yet everyone is different; what works for one does not necessarily work for others.  While some may thrive on being constantly on the go, others like myself, are not one of them.  Perhaps it’s the perfectionist in me, which is what makes slow blogging so appealing.

So, now that we have entered a new year, I will be taking slow blogging to heart.  I’ll be blogging on an intermittent basis.  Blogging will slow right down in order for me to concentrate on my priorities, which is complete my last year of studies and work on my various writing projects.

Ideas about blogging has changed and putting the emphasis back on what’s important – our writing.  This is what we as writers do best after all.

Have you discovered slow blogging? Have you suffered from blogging ‘burn-out’? Are you a writer who blogs or a blogger who writes? As readers, do you see blogging as a good way to connect with writers?

Image of Galapagos Tortoise by Debbie Johansson.

Advertisements

12 thoughts on “The Art of Slow Blogging.

  1. Ha, if I wasn’t classified as a slow blogger, I’d definitely relate more to being idle than someone who writes! But I guess the old adage of quality over quantity wouldn’t stand if it weren’t true! Anyway, hope this is the start of a great association!

    1. Hi lgzpoetry. Good to hear from another slow blogger! I agree that quality over quantity stands the test of time. It’s such a shame that everyone is so busy these days and feeling pressured. I think writers put enough pressure on themselves as it is. Thanks for your comments; it’s nice to meet you. 🙂

  2. Oh I’m with you on this Debbie! I am determined to assume the galapagos shuffle this year on all things social mediaish and refocus. Wishing me, you , us all luck!

    1. Hi Dimity. I think writers have had too much emphasis placed upon their platform and marketing skills, so it’s good to put the focus back on what’s important and why we become writers in the first place. Both writing and platform building takes time, so I really like the sound of the galapagos shuffle. Best of luck with your efforts! 🙂

  3. Hi Debbie, I hope you have a great year with your final year of studies and with writing. Thank you so much for the mention. I’m flattered. As a fiction writer, I’ve practiced slow blogging with once-a-week posts since my blog began.

    However, as I finish the book of my heart and start the planning stages for the next, my humble opinion has led me to believe that my blog posts should become more reader inclusive and reflect what to expect with the books. Post #1 debuts tomorrow as I switch to blogging on an intermittent basis. I am a great fan of slow blogging and would highly recommend it.;-)

    1. Hi Christy. My pleasure in linking to your post about this topic – I agree with your statements. I’ve always posted once a week, but even that has become too much for me lately. So technically, I’ve been a slow blogger all this time without even realising it (D’oh)! I’m doing a similar thing with my own blog, so I look forward to reading your future posts. Thanks for the well wishes and I wish you all the best of luck with your own writing endeavours. 😀

  4. I’ve been having the same struggle. I want to publish only quality work, and I cannot do that with a promise of a once-a-week post. So, I’m only going to post when I feel like I have something to say. It may be twice a week some weeks, or once a month other times.

    1. Hi fantasywritermom. I can so relate! I feel I’ve been so busy putting myself ‘out there’, that my writing has moved into a poor second place. I need to just shut out the rest of the world and spend more time in my imaginary one – which sometimes can be a much nicer place! Thanks for your comments and best of luck with your own blogging efforts. 🙂

    1. Hi Debs. Thanks for stopping by, I appreciate your comments. I’m glad you liked it – food for thought indeed!

  5. Welcome to the Slow Blogosphere! I hope you’re doing some fantastic creative work as you take time from blogging. Thanks a bunch for the shout-out!

    1. Hi Anne. My pleasure for the shout-out; thanks to you I’m now firmly entrenched in the slow blogging camp! I’ve taken the time to step away from social media a little bit, re-focus and get back into writing. Thanks so much for visiting Anne – I’m honoured! 😀

Comments are closed.