Australian Folklore

The Three Sisters and Their Legend.

About 60 kilometres (37 miles) west of Sydney, lies the Blue Mountains. A mountainous region and National Park, it was listed as a World Heritage area by UNESCO in the year 2000. It is called the Blue Mountains due to the blue-grey colours of eucalyptus trees.

The setting for some of my stories are based within the Blue Mountains as I lived there for several years. I’ve always been drawn to the Australian bush, which is an ideal setting for stories of a Gothic or horrific nature.

One of the region’s best-known tourist destinations is The Three Sisters, a unique sandstone rock formation at Katoomba, and is one of Australia’s most photographed landmarks.

People have been known to climb them, but due to their cultural significance to indigenous Australians, there are some restrictions.

Image courtesy Hans Braxmeier on Pixabay

Aboriginal women would give birth in a cave near Echo Point while the men would watch the third sister for a sign that the birth had occurred. It is believed that this third sister is sacred.

When I was young, one of my favourite books was about a dreamtime story on the Three Sisters. My copy was a Little Golden Book, which I still have to this day. 😊

Once, a wise medicine man named Tyawan, was good at imitating the lyre bird and it was rumoured that he could change himself into one if he wanted by using his magic shin-bone. He had three daughters, named Meenhi, Wimlah and Gunnedoo.

One day as he left the girls alone while he hunted, a rock fell over a cliff, waking a bunyip from his 100-year sleep. Seeing the girls, the bunyip went after them. Tyawan arrived back in time to point his magic shin-bone at the girls, turning them to stone. The bunyip chased Tyawan, who turned himself into a lyre-bird, but in his efforts to get away, his magic shin-bone became lost.

The bunyip returned to his cave, but to this day, Tyawan continues to search for his magic shin-bone so that he can turn himself and his three daughters back into human form.

Lyre-bird image courtesy Wikimedia Commons
Book Promotion, First Christmas, My Books

Comfort Reads & Christmas in July.

Image courtesy Pixabay

Hi everyone!

If you’ve been following my blog for a while, and/or read some of my stories, you’ll know I don’t write romance per se, but some of my stories do have romantic elements. Writing romance was a part of the craft I needed to improve, which is why I joined Romance Writers of Australia.

As it is now winter here, I was pleasantly surprised to be asked to be a guest on their blog and talk about my comfort read.

But be warned – my book of choice does not fit the modern definition of a romance novel. 😉

So, grab a cuppa. I hope you join me. ☕

Image courtesy Pixabay

Speaking of romance…

In other news, Christmas has come early!

If you’re looking for a romantic read this month, I’ve got together with romance writers to celebrate ‘Christmas in July’.

In fact, I’ve joined two promotions, so there’s over a hundred books for you to choose from!

My book, First Christmas, is included and contains two paranormal romance short stories.

Click the links below for further details.

Christmas Romance in July

Sweet Christmas Romance in July

These promotions are for this month only, so grab them while they last!

Happy reading and have a great weekend. 😊

 

 

Life Lessons, This Writer's Life, Up Close & Personal, Writing

The Writing Journey: Persistence Matters.

Image courtesy of Pixabay.

In November of 2019, I self-published my first short story. Since then, I have published two more short stories and recently published my first novella, the first in a series. I have learned a few things along the way, and being an author is an occupation where you are always learning. But I think one of the biggest things I’ve learnt is that indie publishing is not for the faint of heart.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m one of the most determined and obstinate people you will ever find (just ask my husband), but one of my biggest weaknesses is comparing myself to others. I’ve been telling myself (and you here on this blog), that everyone’s writing journey is different, and this is my way to remind myself of this reality. In her book Dear Writer, You Need to Quit, Becca Syme has an entire chapter on the subject – ‘Quit Trying to Be Like Everyone Else.’ It’s good to know that there are other people out there who feel the same way I do. Even though my husband has been telling me this for years, I guess I needed to also hear it from others.

However, back in September 2020, things started to fall down around me. Despite being in a network of other writers, I felt alone. Even though they are lovely people whom I’m happy to have as writing friends, it began to dawn on me that they were not my ‘tribe.’ What I write does not necessarily gel with theirs. I started to pull away and even though I published another book of short stories a couple of months later, I began to go through one of the longest bouts of depression I have ever experienced.

Throughout this period and into a new year, I spent months setting up and sending out newsletters, and preparing my first Gothic novella for publication. I wondered what the point was because nobody cared, no-one was interested. I felt like a complete failure, but I persisted. As recently as April, a month before publication, my husband told me that if I wasn’t enjoying it anymore, then don’t do it. Do something else. I couldn’t stop because writing is all I’ve ever wanted to do. ‘This is me,’ I told him. ‘This is who I am.’ He just didn’t get it.

I like to keep this quote on my desk as a constant reminder.

It was also around this time, that something started to happen, a kind of shift. A fellow writer put me onto David Gaughran’s course ‘Starting from Zero.’ As I prepared my next book for its release, I began to use what he taught me. Shortly after release, a Facebook friend sent me a request to join a group for indie horror writers. From that group, I was asked to participate in a competition for Gothic writers, as well as join a group for Gothic readers (which also included writers). I had finally found my ‘tribe.’

Together, these two incidents, helped make the launch of The Curse of Marsden Hall, my most successful. It reached as high as No.4 in one of its categories on Amazon Australia and was one of its ‘hot new releases.’ This then helped one of my other short stories, First Christmas, reach No.2 (yes, you read that right) in one of its categories on Amazon Australia.

A rare moment of seeing two of my books side by side in the Top 20.

Of-course such a high is short lived and it was a good couple of weeks while it lasted, but it gives me hope that maybe – just maybe – things might be starting to change on my writing journey.

For eight months I struggled with self-doubt and depression, but it was also a journey of self-discovery. I’ve learned who I am as a writer, both in my genre and my process. I’ve come to the conclusion, that although I may not become a big name, what’s important for me is the writing itself, and making my readers happy. Who knows, I might become an ‘overnight success’ by the time I’ve published my 20th book! 😉

Yes, I’ll continue to doubt myself and make mistakes along the way, but I’ve managed to overcome this hurdle. Persistence (and a healthy dose of stubbornness) pays off.

Being an indie author is hard work but there’s no point in worrying about things out of your control. Keep showing up and put yourself out there. Have fun, and love what you do!

It’s been some months since I last posted about writing and my writing journey (and reading this post, you’ll understand why). This hasn’t been an easy post for me to write, but I do so because I prefer to be honest with you and maybe help others who are struggling with their own writing journey.

Book Promotion, Books, Legacy & Other Short Stories, The Ghost at Willow Creek

Curl Up With a Chilling Read.

Image courtesy Pixabay.

Hi everyone!

It’s time once again for a little shameless promo.

I’ve partnered with other authors this month to give you some spooky reads. From 1-15 June, our books are either Free on Kindle Unlimited or 99cents each.

The collection is a mix of genres, including horror, mystery, and suspense, so there’s something for everyone.

Both my short stories The Ghost at Willow Creek and Legacy and Other Short Stories are on the list! If you haven’t yet read either, now is a good opportunity to try one – or both! 😉

Click this link for details – Chilling Reads

This promotion is for two weeks only, so grab it while it lasts!

Happy reading and have a great weekend. 🙂

Writing

‘The Curse of Marsden Hall’ is Now Available!

Image courtesy of Pixabay.

The day has finally arrived! My novella, The Curse of Marsden Hall, is now available!

Many thanks to those of you who pre-ordered a copy. I really appreciate it! 🙂 Your support means so much to me. It’s nerve-wracking releasing a book into the world, but knowing that my stories are being read (and enjoyed) is what keeps me going.

Here is the blurb:-

Some things are better left alone.

Australia, 1875.

Successful businessman, Richard Marsden, is going to marry his sweetheart and has built the house of his dreams. Despite the scenic location, Richard’s house in the Wolfrose Mountains sits on land with a chequered past, one full of violence, witchcraft, and murder. He does not believe in curses or superstition.

When something unexpected happens, he wonders if the land he built on is indeed cursed and begins to question his own sanity.

Meanwhile, someone or something is watching… waiting.

Get your copy here!

It is available through Amazon for only $1.20AU ($0.93US).

Thank you for your support and have a lovely weekend! xx

Australia's Historical Places, Australian Folklore, Ghosts & The Paranormal, Spooky Stories

The Ghost of The Blue Mountains.

Australia’s colonial history has a bloodied past, with some of these stories handed down into folklore. The story of a ghost at Mount Victoria Pass is no exception and had been popularised in Australian literature during the 1890s.

The ghost is believed to be that of a young woman by the name of Caroline Collits. She married her husband, William, in 1840. He came from a respectable family but was generally regarded as a person of ‘weak mind’ and a bit of a spendthrift.

Their marriage was not a happy one, and eventually, Caroline left him and moved in with her sister and brother-in-law, John Walsh. Caroline’s new housing arrangements caused rumours that she was having an affair with her brother-in-law and was regarded as a woman of ‘loose character.’

There was talk of a reconciliation with her husband, and together with her brother-in-law, met William in a local tavern. After leaving the tavern, John Walsh attacked William Collits. Caroline intervened, allowing her husband to escape and called after him to run for his life. This was the last time she was seen alive.

The ghost at Mount Victoria is Australia’s own ‘woman in black’.

Caroline’s battered body was found the following morning near the road on Victoria Pass. Her skull had been smashed in with a large stone, which had been found nearby, covered in her blood and hair. Despite his pleas of innocence, John Walsh was arrested for her murder. He was later convicted and hanged.

In the years that followed, rumours of ghostly encounters surfaced as travellers used the road on cold, windy nights. One such encounter involved a couple of young men whose horse became so spooked, it refused to go any further. As they moved closer to the bridge, the figure of a woman appeared, dressed in black. She did not move or utter a word. One of the young men described her eyes as if ‘there were sparks of fire in ‘em.’ She then went on to raise both her arms and open her mouth, making a noise which ‘sounded like no ‘uman or animal I ever ‘eard.’ The horse bolted, taking his male companions down the road with him.

This story would influence the poet, Henry Lawson, some years later when he came to live in nearby Mount Victoria. One of the verses described the incident as follows: –

Its look appeared to plead for aid
(As far as I could see),
Its hands were on the tailboard laid,
Its eyes were fixed on me.
The face, it cannot be denied
Was white, a dull dead white,
The great black eyes were opened wide
And glistened in the light.

‘The Ghost at the Second Bridge.’ Henry Lawson (1867-1922).

These days, the road is part of a busy highway, where the old bridges are barely visible. It would then come as no surprise that sighting of Caroline’s ghost in the area have not occurred for quite some time.

She may yet wander the road alone, her mournful cries unheard, but her story continues to live on.

My Books, The Curse of Marsden Hall

‘The Curse of Marsden Hall’ Available for Pre-Order.

Image courtesy of Pixabay.

Hi everyone! I hope you are well.

Just a quick post to let you know that my novella, The Curse of Marsden Hall, is now available for pre-order.

It will be released on 21 May, but you can order your copy NOW. It is available through Amazon for only $1.20AU ($0.94US).

Thank you for your support and have a great weekend! 🙂

My Books, The Curse of Marsden Hall

‘The Curse of Marsden Hall’ is Almost Here!

Here it is everyone! I can finally reveal the cover for my upcoming novella, ‘The Curse of Marsden Hall.’

With this book, I decided to experiment and do something a little bit different. I asked for opinions from some friends on Facebook and was pleased with the feedback I received.

That experiment was putting my other creative side to the test and creating my own cover. As this is the first book in a series (I have two more in the pipeline), I will be creating the covers for those as well. I hope you like it!

Here is the blurb: –

Some things are better left alone.

Australia, 1875.

Successful businessman, Richard Marsden, is going to marry his sweetheart and has built the house of his dreams. Despite the scenic location, Richard’s house in the Wolfrose Mountains sits on land with a chequered past, one full of violence, witchcraft, and murder. He does not believe in curses or superstition.

When something unexpected happens, he wonders if the land he built on is indeed cursed and begins to question his own sanity.

Meanwhile, someone or something is watching… waiting.

* * * * *

‘The Curse of Marsden Hall’ will be released on 21 May. I’ll let you know when it’s ready for pre-order. 🙂

Australia's Historical Places, Australian Folklore, Ghosts & The Paranormal, Inspiration, Spooky Stories, The Story Behind the Story

The Ghosts of Bungarribee.

I love a good ghost story and I consume as many books on the subject as I can get my hands on. A couple of years ago, while perusing one of our local second-hand book shops, I found another book to add to my collection. It contained a few Australian ghost stories I had never heard of before. One of them, about a haunted house that was once located in Sydney’s western suburbs, would become the inspiration behind my novella The Curse of Marsden Hall.

In 1821, Major John Campbell arrived in Australia with his family, soon buying land around Eastern Creek. At the time, it was believed the site was where a battle between two warring Aboriginal tribes took place, some believing it was a sacred site. These have since been disproven and ‘Bungarribee’ means ‘creek with cockatoos’ or ‘creek with campsite’.

In 1822, the house was convict-built, with some convicts dying during the construction. It is believed that one was murdered there. As the house was nearing completion in 1826, John Campbell’s wife died. The last section of the house, a round drawing-room and tower, began the following year. It was during construction that John Campbell, himself, died less than twelve months later. After his death, the house would change hands many times. Rumours began to spread that the house was cursed, or even haunted; the first reference dating back to 1838.

Legend has it that the next death after the Campbell’s was that of an army officer. It is believed he lost a duel and shot himself in one of the tower rooms, his body in a pool of blood. Another army officer was later found at Bungarribee, his body discovered on the grounds. Apparently seeking refuge and escaping creditors, it is believed the words ‘died of hunger’, were written beside his body.

Bugarribee Homestead during better days.

A number of strange events seem to focus on the circular drawing room and its tower. In the room where the officer shot himself, bloodstains appeared on the floor. Despite the best efforts of housemaids, they would reappear the next day. Muffled sounds, scratching, and scraping would be heard in the tower, as well as the clanking of chains at night. While sleeping in one of the tower rooms, people would wake up feeling cold hands around their necks or be touched.

There have been reported sightings of a young woman, dressed in white, crying outside the circular drawing-room. Sometimes she would be seen clawing at the glass as if trying to gain entry into the room. There are also reported sightings of convict ghosts, lights in the tower rooms (when not occupied at the time), and animals, such as horses, refusing to go near the house.

By 1910, Bungarribee began to deteriorate with age and neglect, and the land was subdivided. By the early 1950s, despite some attempts at restoration, the house was a complete ruin. The Government bought what remained in 1956, and the house was demolished a year later.

Today, the site where the homestead once stood is a public reserve called Heritage Park. The ghost stories of Bungarribee continue to be handed down into folklore.

Are you looking for a scary read?

If you enjoy paranormal and horror stories, there are over 60 books to choose from for FREE with mailing list sign up. My flash fiction, Forever Autumn, is also included.

This giveaway is for this month only, so don’t miss out!

Click on this link for details – Paranormal and Horror Giveaway Reads

Movies/Television, My Books

The Romance of ‘The Ghost and Mrs. Muir’ (1947), plus Ghostly Reads.

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir has always been one of my favourite movies. A romance with a ghost— what’s not to love? And with Valentine’s Day upon us, February is the perfect time to watch it.

If you’re unaware of the plot, the story involves Mrs. Lucy Muir, a widow with a young daughter. She decides to move into a seaside cottage, despite being told that it has a ghost. In fact, she rather relishes the idea! She encounters the ghost of a former sea captain, Daniel Gregg, and soon become friends.

One of the things I’ve always liked about this film is the banter between the two main characters, which demonstrates their growing relationship. Daniel Gregg (Rex Harrison) even has a special name for Lucy Muir, which I think is rather sweet. Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney are perfectly suited in the roles, and it would have to be my favourite film of Rex Harrison’s. Seeing George Sanders in the role of Miles Fairly (children’s author ‘Uncle Neddy’) always felt appropriate to me. He played the role of Jack Favell in Rebecca (1940), so he plays a charming rake very well. It’s great to see a young Natalie Wood as Anna, and I enjoy her performance, although her American accent does stand out amongst the English setting.

The music and lighting help adds to the atmosphere and gives it a sense of place. The special effects are deftly done, blending in well, and do not detract from the story. Although sometimes, I can’t help but look at the seagulls outside the bedroom window!

My favourite romantic ghost story, I had to get my own copy.

I really like the sets, especially ‘Gull Cottage’, where the story mainly takes place. It makes me wistful for a seaside cottage of my own. I also like the set of the lavishly appointed home of Miles Fairly and wish there were more scenes shot here (yes, I’m a hopeless romantic and a sticky-beak 😉).

The most heart-breaking scene of the film is where Daniel Gregg (Rex Harrison) leaves, saying goodbye to Lucy as she sleeps. It’s such a touching scene and beautifully done.

The ending, although sad, is to be expected, but it is also a happy ending, of sorts.

If you’re looking for a romantic movie with a difference this Valentine’s Day (or any day, for that matter), I highly recommend this film.

Are you looking for a ghostly read this February?

Speaking of ghosts, are you interested in a ghostly read?

This month, I’ve partnered with other authors to bring you some spooky reads. The collection is a mix of genres, including mystery, romance, fantasy, and horror. All with a ghost (or two), so there’s something for everyone.

Both my short stories The Ghost at Willow Creek and First Christmas are also on the list!

Just click on this link for details – Ghostly February

Do you have a favourite ‘ghostly romance?’ Is there a special film you like to watch for Valentine’s Day? Have you read any good ghost stories lately?