Back to the 80s

Songs We Were Listening to in 1984, Part 2.


This week is the second part of the list of songs I’ve compiled that we listened to in 1984. If you’re interested in seeing the Top 10 songs, you can find them at Rolling Stone.

In 1984, Red Hot Chili Peppers made their debut, Michael Jackson received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and Madonna sparked controversy with her performance of ‘Like a Virgin’ onstage during the MTV Music Video Awards.

Relax – Frankie Goes to Hollywood

Controversial on its release, it went on to top the UK singles chart, selling 2 million copies in the UK alone. It became one of the most commercially successful songs of the decade.

Footloose – Kenny Loggins

This was one of many movie soundtracks released during 1984. Kevin Bacon looks so cute, and his VW beetle looks eerily familiar to my very first car. 😉

Take on Me – A-ha

This song became an international No.1 hit, and the music video was ahead of its time, winning six awards at the MTV video awards in 1986. It is considered to be the band’s signature song.

When the Doves Cry – Prince

It would be remiss of me to compile a list of songs of 1984, without mentioning the No.1 song of the year. It featured in the film ‘Purple Rain’ and in later years would go on to enter The Rock and Roll’s Hall of Fame.

Thriller – Michael Jackson

I wasn’t a big fan of Michael Jackson, but he sure knew how to dance as shown in this video. The man was practically liquid! Although a long clip (this is the shorter version), it showcased his many talents. I think it was also one of his best songs, and with a cemetery, zombies, and the wonderful Vincent Price, what’s not to love? 😉

What song/songs define the 1980s to you? Do you enjoy listening to movie soundtracks? Was there a song/artist from the 80s you didn’t like, but you’ve since changed your mind?

Image courtesy Pixabay

Back to the 80s

Songs We Were Listening to in 1984, Part 1.

The year 1984 was an interesting year in music. It was the year Michael Jackson’s hair caught fire during the filming of a Pepsi commercial, and Elton John got married in Sydney. It was also the year Band Aid released the single ‘Do They Know it’s Christmas?’ which became the fastest-selling single of all time in the UK (and probably to the world’s ears, was the most played single).

If you are interested in seeing the Top 10 songs for the year, you can find them at Rolling Stone, which lists the Top 100 for 1984.

Here I’ve compiled a variety of songs in two parts of what we listened to in 1984.

Burn for You – INXS

This song came from their album The Swing, an album that received international attention, and the rest, as they say, is history. Miss you, Michael!

Rebel Yell – Billy Idol

I wasn’t a big fan of Billy Idol per se, but I did enjoy the music, which I guess is what it’s all about. This one still stands the test of time.

Hold Me Now – Thompson Twins

No twins, no member of the band with the name Thompson, but they did come up with this beautiful, sad song, which was an international success.

You Spin me Round (Like a Record) – Dead or Alive

Okay, I couldn’t resist this one! 😉 This came out at a time when Culture Club and Marilyn were popular.

Pride (In the Name of Love) – U2

I really liked U2 in the 1980s, with some of my friends having crushes on them at the time (yes, Larry was cute). This song went on to become one of their most popular.

I’ll be back next week with another five songs of 1984.

Were you listening to these songs back in 1984? Do you still listen to them? Have you discovered 1980s music and prefer to listen to them instead of/as well as today’s music?

Main image courtesy Pixabay

Back to the 80s

Top 5 Worst Mullets of the 1980s.

As if 2020 couldn’t get any worse, I saw a post from a friend on Facebook that said mullets were coming back.

My instant reaction to that was this: –

The mullet would have to be one of the worst hairstyles ever created. To me, it’s up there with the rat tail, where I have the irresistible urge to grab a pair of scissors and cut it off.

Mullets were popular in the 1980s, with well-known celebrities choosing to embarrass themselves. Some didn’t carry it off too badly I guess (Patrick Swayze and Mel Gibson to name a few), but there were others that will probably go down in the hall of shame.

This was a tough list to make, as there are some real shockers out there. I think the award for the worst mullet of all time would have to go to Billy Ray Cyrus, but that famous mullet didn’t make our skin crawl until the early 1990s.

Here is what I think are five of the worst: –

5. Bono

As if having a mullet wasn’t bad enough, the blonde streak doesn’t help. Makes him look like a cockatoo.

4. Warwick Capper

Well known in Australia at the time for playing Aussie Rules football, Warwick Kapper was famous for his tight shorts as well as his horrible mullets.

3. Andre Agassi

I can understand wearing a headband while playing tennis, but with a mullet it borders on the ridiculous.

2. Michael Bolton

I think this one was a shocker due to the curls and the very short fringe (if any). Either way, it is up there with the worst.

1. Limahl

With his two-tone, spiky combo, this particular mullet is a cross between a crowned crane and a bird’s nest. It would have to be the worst mullet of the 1980s.

What are your thoughts? Are there particular mullets of the 1980s that really stand out for you? Do you like mullets or do you find them cringe-worthy?

Main image courtesy Pixabay

IWSG, This Writer's Life

IWSG: Remember Why You Started.

Recently, during these crazy days of a world pandemic, I was fortunate to spend some time away from home. My husband referred to it as my ‘writing retreat’. We had no access to the outside world, which was very relaxing. It was the perfect way to pause and reflect.

I came to think about why I started on this writing journey in the first place. Back to my childhood, using my imaginary worlds as a way to escape reality. Writing about the things I loved, what I was passionate about.

I preferred to be left alone, and nature was always the perfect environment. Either in the bush or on the beach, my imagination would take hold and there were always stories to tell. I was able to express what could not be said in the real world.

Taking that time away, feeling slightly cut off from civilisation, the days became slower, calmer. It allowed me to focus on the things that were important in my life, and writing has always been a part of that. I had become too caught up on all the other things that are part of the writer’s life when it comes to indie publishing.

My husband told me that without social media as a distraction, I was able to get more work done. What I really needed was discipline. What I needed was to remain focused on the act of writing itself, to tell my stories.

That’s why I started writing in the first place.

Do you remember why you started writing? What do you do to keep disciplined in your writing and avoid distractions? Do you create your own ‘writing retreats’? Have you managed to get some time away from the ‘real world’ lately?

The purpose of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group is to share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds.

Image courtesy Pixabay

Movies/Television

The Silent Fear of ‘A Quiet Place’.

‘A Quiet Place’ is one of those films that I had heard about, but it took a while for me to get around to seeing. These days, when it comes to watching horror, I tend to be a bit selective. I am after a good story, not just shock value.

*This comes with a spoiler alert if you haven’t already seen the film.

I’ve watched ‘A Quiet Place’ a couple of times now, and I foolishly have to admit that when I watched it the first time, I missed out on one very vital piece of information. I don’t know how I missed the fact that the daughter, Regan, is deaf and it left me confused for a little while. I couldn’t figure out how these people knew how to speak sign language*. Eventually, it twigged, but if you miss that scene where the viewer sees Regan’s hearing aid for the first time (I picked it up on my second viewing), it can make the story a bit confusing during the early scenes.

The viewer is immediately thrust into a dystopian future, and one is left wondering what had happened. We are given hints through various newspaper clippings and posters of missing people, as well as how long it has been since the first day it all took place. This is the only background the viewer is given, so hopefully in ‘A Quiet Place II’, this question will be answered.

Although a horror film, ‘A Quiet Place’ focuses on family and how they need to work together to survive. The title also suggests that after the tragic death of one of their own, each of them is struggling with their grief and have difficulty in expressing their feelings.

I liked the idea that their survival depends on sound (or lack thereof), and that the family’s survival depends on their daughter, Regan, being deaf. That, I thought, was an interesting approach.

Visually, these alien creatures reminded me of the demogorgons in ‘Stranger Things’. As with ‘Aliens’, they are intelligent and fast-moving. I found them to be more weird-looking than frightening. I think the horror lay in the build-up of tension throughout the film, knowing that even the slightest noise attracts them. This is what had me on edge.

Added to the tension was the fact that the mother was pregnant and due to give birth at any time. This poses new difficulties, not only after the baby’s birth but during delivery.

My only real issue with the film was the ending, although I get why it was done. No sooner does the audience get some resolution, we jump straight into the next problem and that is where it ends. Cliff-hanger ending in anticipation for the next film.

I watched ‘A Quiet Place’ earlier in the year in preparation to see the next one. Sadly, COVID-19 put an end to that. Cliff-hanger ending indeed!

*Yes, I know – ‘Duh!’ 😉

What I’ve been watching this past month: –

Lost Girls (Netflix)

This film is based on the true story of one mother’s quest to find her missing daughter, and in the process, uncovers a connection to those of the Long Island serial killer. This story reveals what a strong woman Mari Gilbert was, and is even sadder knowing what happened after these events.

Ice-Cold Killers, Seasons 1-4 (Foxtel)

This is a true-crime documentary series, set in the harsh climates of Alaska and other states of America where it can get quite cold. I found the first two seasons, which were based in Alaska, to be interesting due to their remote location.

Abducted in Plain Sight (Netflix)

This documentary is about the double abduction of a young girl by a trusted friend of the family. I found this difficult to watch, and at one point, literally had to cover my mouth in shock. A remarkable true story of trust, betrayal, and manipulation. Quite extraordinary!

Have you watched ‘A Quiet Place’? What are your thoughts on cliff-hanger endings? Are you selective of your viewing habits these days? What have you been watching lately?

First Christmas, Ghosts & The Paranormal, My Books, The Story Behind the Story

‘First Christmas’ is Coming.

Yay, my next book is coming!

Normally, I don’t write anything with a particular theme in mind, but this one has a bit of history behind it. And let’s face it, 2020 has been a pretty crappy year.

Before Christmas, 2019, as part of the Romance Writers of Australia, the aspiring group held a competition. We were given prompts in which to write a 1,500-word short story, which was to be judged and awarded prizes. My short story did not get a prize and I didn’t have a problem with it, as I was stepping out of my comfort zone. I was, however, encouraged by the judge’s feedback: –

‘Such a beautiful, evocative story. An emotion-filled tale that would appeal to many readers who like historical novels too.’

After this, I decided with some hesitation, to enter my first RWA ‘Sweet Treats’ competition. There are three judges to this competition and ‘the third judge’ is well known for being not only the deciding factor, but brutal. I called them ‘the hanging judge’ and the feedback I received was indeed harsh. As a result, I can honestly say that: –

  1. It took me a few months before I could look at my story again, as well as read the feedback with a critical eye, and
  2. I won’t be entering any RWA competitions in a hurry. 😉

I, therefore, chose to focus on the positive feedback from the other two judges, which basically said that it showed promise.

‘Plot and characterisation great! The reader wants the MC to be happy after so much sorrow, and that matters. Tightening up the story will let these lovely characters shine.’

Like my first story, I believed in this one too. I didn’t wish to be put off by one judge’s opinion. I wanted readers to decide.

If I worked on it and did a bit of tweaking, I could put them both into a book and publish it in time for Christmas. The end result is First Christmas.

These stories are a bit different to what I usually write, but 2020 hasn’t been the best of years, and I wanted to write something with a bit of hope. Both short stories have a paranormal bent but are romantic in nature.

I’m working on having First Christmas released in November, so watch this space. 😊

Have you received negative feedback in a writing competition? Do you write with particular themes in mind? Given the current COVID-19 situation, have you written something different than usual this year?

Image courtesy Unsplash

IWSG, Writing

IWSG: Write What You Love.

Some years ago, I woke up from a very strange dream. It was so strange, that I kept thinking about it throughout the day, and decided to write the idea down. It was a horror story, and it became my first attempt at a short story. My husband read it and called it macabre, which I naturally took as a compliment. 😉

Originally, I never intended to write short stories, nor paranormal fiction. When I first started writing, I wanted to write novel-length pieces, but I always fell short. I also think this was due, in part, to the fact that at the time, I wanted to write romances. I fell I love with Jane Austen and continue to admire her work. As a teen, I read a lot of sweet romances and even tried writing a novel for Mills and Boon. Despite my best efforts, I just couldn’t do it. Anything romantic would need to have a dark side. I was well and truly into Bronte territory.

My muse was clearly taking me down some dark alleys.

I grew up watching a lot of film and television. Horror, suspense, and mysteries really caught my attention. I was also fascinated by the paranormal. What was staring me in the face, I chose to ignore, until only a few years ago. I finally gave in to my muse and I believe I have now finally found my ‘voice’.

From that strange dream, I went on to write more short stories, entered short story competitions, and even self-published a couple of them. Later this year, in time for Christmas, I will be releasing a couple more. I am also currently working on a series of novellas.

I love the short form and will continue to write them. Meanwhile, with a lot of trial and error, my novel drafts are slowly beginning to take shape. 😉

Have you written in a form or genre you hadn’t planned writing in? Do you choose a form/genre in advance?

The purpose of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group is to share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds.

Image courtesy Pixabay

Movies/Television

The Allure of ‘My Cousin Rachel’.

Some years ago, I listened to the audiobook of ‘My Cousin Rachel’, and like her previous work, I was drawn into Daphne du Maurier’s world. As Olivia de Havilland celebrated her 104th birthday this month, I felt it appropriate to watch one of her films.

One of the things that drew me in straight away was seeing Richard Burton as Philip Ashley, which was his first Hollywood role. I’ve always liked Richard Burton and absolutely love his voice and he does well in this role. He plays a convincing angry, tormented, even obsessed character which shifts from revenge to love and back again. Olivia de Havilland portrays a friendly, charming widow, where on occasion, the audience sees another side to her, leaving one to question if she is all she appears to be.

Suspicious of his cousin, Philip enters Rachel’s bedroom, searching her drawers for evidence. Here he discovers seeds. Sadly, though, I think more could have been made leading up to this discovery. Perhaps the hints were too subtle, like when Rachel makes tea. Other than the mention of a tree in Italy in passing towards the end of the film, there is no indication of Rachel’s interest in botany or of laburnum and its poison.

I was impressed with both the film’s costumes and set design. The sets include a couple of scenes in Italy, but mainly those of Ashley House in Cornwall. The architecture within Ashley House, with its timber and stonework, give it a very Gothic atmosphere.

Overall, though, my takeaway from the entire film was Richard Burton’s performance. Perhaps it may also have to do with the fact that he is the main character and the story is told from his point of view. We see his anger and mistrust turn into an obsession so that at times he verges on madness.

This 1952 film version is a good adaptation of the novel, filled with atmosphere and suspense. I just think more could have been made of the possibility of poison to further heighten the suspicion towards Rachel for the viewer, as it had done for Philip Ashley.

What I’ve been watching this past month: –

Unsolved Mysteries (Netflix)

Netflix has resurrected this series I used to watch in the 1980s, once hosted by Robert Stack. This season of six episodes involves disappearances, shocking murders, and UFO encounters. I love a good mystery and I binge-watched this show. I’m really looking forward to a second season. It’s made me want to revisit the original series, currently streaming on Amazon Prime Video.

Dark Angel (Amazon Prime Video)
This is a drama miniseries, based on the life of Mary Ann Cotton. Played by Joanna Froggatt (of Downton Abby fame), she portrays Britain’s first female serial killer. I enjoyed this show, and Froggatt does well in the role. Maybe it’s because I have seen her in other more ‘nicer’ roles, seeing her in this one made me feel uneasy.

Doc Martin, Season 8 (Netflix)

For something a bit lighter this month, I returned to Portwenn. I really like the Doc (his lack of social skills included), and this fictional Cornish town with its quirky characters. I especially enjoyed the final episode, with a special appearance by Sigourney Weaver, and her interchanges with Mrs. Tishell. 🙂

Do you enjoy watching old movies? What have you been watching this month? Have world events inspired you to watch something lighter or has it made little difference to your viewing habits?

IWSG, Writing Process

IWSG: Dealing with Re-writes & Feedback.

This past month, my insecurities have involved the re-writes to my first novella, and feedback from beta readers.

Fortunately, my beta readers came back with positive feedback, although it can get confusing sometimes when opinions vary. What one thinks needs some work, others might think it’s fine the way it is. It can take a little while to digest it all, but at the end of the day, it’s our stories and we take the suggestions on-board that resonate with us.

The re-writing itself though is a different matter.

Faced with doing re-writes for the novella, and incorporating the feedback, I felt overwhelmed by the challenge. It can be quite daunting, and I began to doubt if I could do it. I was beginning to feel like a rabbit caught in the headlights. This is pretty much the same reaction I used to have before writing an essay assignment for University. I know now, this is just part of my process.

I broke the re-writes down into smaller parts, working on one scene a day, which was much more manageable. I will probably use the same technique when I write my first novel.

I currently have two more novellas to re-write, as well as a couple of short stories I plan to self-publish in time for Christmas, but at least I know how to tackle it.

By the end of this year, I should be very experienced with the re-writing stage! 😉

How do you tackle the re-writing process? Have you found the feedback from beta readers beneficial to your writing? What have you been insecure about this month?

The purpose of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group is to share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds.

Image courtesy Unsplash

Movies/Television

Revisiting the film ‘Rebecca’.

A few months ago, I listened to the audiobook of Rebecca, which was the perfect excuse to watch the 1940 film version all over again. This film introduced me to the book when I was a kid and has been one of my favourites ever since.

The film stays reasonably close to the book, where the young, nameless protagonist marries Maxim de Winter, owner of Manderley. Here she is witness to constant reminders of Rebecca, his former wife so that she believes Maxim is still in love with her. The constant reminder of his first wife is strengthened by the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers. Played by Judith Anderson, she does a brilliant job of portraying a cold, vindictive, and jealous character. Mrs. Danvers is loyal to Rebecca, almost to the point of obsession.

This obsession is revealed in its full glory during the scene where Mrs. Danvers shows the new Mrs de Winter around Rebecca’s bedroom for the first time. The room has not changed since the day Rebecca died and is immaculate. The curtains, the furniture, even down to the embroidery, it truly is a beautiful room. Like many of the other sets, a lot of work went into making this one. So much so, I wouldn’t have minded a room like that myself. 😉

Joan Fontaine does a great job as the shy, tormented Mrs de Winter and Laurence Oliver also portrays a convincing Maxim de Winter. Perhaps it was due to his portrayal that I have always seen Maxim and the new Mrs de Winter in a father/daughter relationship, rather than any great romance.

The suspense in this film has a slow, gradual build, heightening the tension and the mystery surrounding Rebecca. You do not see any images of her, but one does not have to because the characters help to build a picture in the viewers’ minds, adding to the suspense. This is what Alfred Hitchcock excelled at.

The special effects are of-course dated, but it still helps with the overall mood of the film, especially when it comes to Manderley itself. Despite this, I think the film is a masterpiece of the Gothic genre and one of Hitchcock’s greatest works.

What I’ve been watching this past month:-

Supernatural, Season One (Amazon Prime Video)

This series follows brothers Sam and Dean Winchester as they search for their missing father, who is on the trail of the daemon that killed their mother over twenty years ago. I had watched this season of Supernatural some years ago, but then somehow forgot all about it. I enjoy the stories, which include urban legends, as well as the banter between the brothers, and the efforts they go to when it comes to involving themselves in investigations. I now have a lot of catching up to do with the Winchester brothers!

Deadwater Fell (Foxtel)
After a house fire kills a mother and her three children, the only remaining survivor is her husband. Investigators discover all five were drugged, and that this ideal family was far from happy. There are a few twists in this show so that the viewer questions who is responsible. With David Tennent in the lead role, he plays a character I was not at all expecting.

Downton Abbey, Season One (Amazon Prime Video)

The first series of this popular drama follows the lives of the Crawley family and their staff after the sinking of the Titanic, leading up to the events of WWI. I have watched the first five seasons of this show before, but have never seen the sixth, and final season. I am watching them all again for this very purpose, as well as taking note of the first couple of seasons for research. My favourite characters were always Sybil Crawley and the Dowager Countess, played by Maggie Smith.

What have you been watching this month? Have you been re-visiting some old favourites? Do you have a favourite character from Downton Abbey or Supernatural?