#IWSG: Where Do You See Yourself Five Years From Now?

sparkler-677774_1280It’s time once again for this month’s post for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group. A different question is asked each month, where your answers are shared and you encourage others who are struggling. It’s a great way to meet fellow writers, so if you’re interested, you can join here.

As the year is heading to a close and we’re about to see in another year, this months’ question is appropriate. It’s one that, as writers, we need to consider every year. When it comes to making long term plans, sometimes life can get in the way, steers us off course and before we know it, time has passed us by.

So in terms of writing, where do I see myself five years from now? The answer to that is: published. That has always been the goal for me. Unfortunately, fear has prevented me from doing so, long before now. I’ll be honest with you; I’ve let fear and the negativity of others prevent me from moving forward.

So, how do I plan to get there? By writing like crazy (and yes, writing can make us a bit that way at times too😉 )!

computingI have some incomplete novels, novelettes/novellas and short stories waiting to be worked on. I also have a list of story ideas that have been waiting (some impatiently) to be told and there is always the new shiny idea that is prepared to show itself. So, as it stands, the ideas are there, they just need to be written or improved upon.

I plan to start getting published by sending out my short stories. My husband has read over them for me recently, and believes with a little bit of tweaking, they will be good to go (one he says can be sent out already). This is just the first step in swallowing that fear in letting others read my writing and I’m hoping to find some other beta readers before I hit that ‘send’ button. This will, I hope give me the courage to begin the road to self-publication.

mouse-stressOf-course, there is also a lot of reading to be done to help improve my craft, as well as attending courses and conferences, learning as much as I can about the publishing industry and being part of a writing community.

Insecure Writers Support Group BadgeThe road to publication is a long one, which is why in order to succeed we need to be in this for the long haul. As the industry changes so rapidly these days, we must also be adaptable and that can sometimes include our writing goals.

In terms of your writing career, where do you see yourself five years from now? What’s your plan to get there? Do you stick to your New Year Resolutions?

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Image courtesy of Pixabay

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#IWSG: What Is Your Favourite Aspect of Being a Writer?

take-532097_1280It’s time once again for this month’s post for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group. A different question is asked each month, where your answers are shared and you encourage others who are struggling. It’s a great way to meet fellow writers, so if you’re interested, you can join here.

There are many good things about being a writer; choosing your own hours, working wherever you want, but my favourite aspect of being a writer has to be telling the stories you need to tell. It’s those voices in your head that tell you what to write, which helps determine what genre/s to write in and how you need to go about telling them. Sure, friends and family tend to give us strange looks or even a wide berth, but we’re fortunate enough not to be considered strange enough to be placed in a padded cell – well, at least not yet, anyway.

minionvoicesIt’s the spark of an idea that comes to you through experience; from something you see, hear or read, through an issue that you feel passionate about. It’s the idea of being able to create people’s lives, places and whole new worlds within our imaginations. Our imagination lights up and fires our creative souls to produce something you hope others will appreciate. In short, it’s the joy of creating something we see in our minds eye and moulding it into shape through the use of words. The best part of being a writer is to give those voices free reign; after all everyone has a story to tell – even those voices within your own head.😉

Insecure Writers Support Group BadgeWithout a doubt I’ll be giving free reign to the voices in my head this month by yet again participating in NaNoWriMo. I’ve been busy doing my preparations, so I’m eager to get started (just don’t expect to see too much of me around here for a while)!

What is your favourite aspect of being a writer? Do you enjoy the writing process? Are you doing NaNoWriMo this year?

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Image courtesy of Pixabay

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How Pinterest Can Help You Plan Your Novel.

pinterest-793051_1280I was a late-comer when it came to joining Pinterest. I was a bit dubious at the thought and found it was a case of ‘not another social network’. When I did eventually join I soon found it to be quite useful; especially when it came to planning a novel.

Recently, I have been working on writing my first novella (or is that a novelette?), and in order to help me ‘see’ what I was writing, I created a secret board. I scoured the internet for pictures of my setting, characters and various articles for research. Once I began doing this, I had a better understanding about my characters (especially my protagonist) and the world in which they live. The only downside to gathering pictures on Pinterest however, is like any other form of research – it can become time-consuming. You get so caught up in it, that the writing side can become sadly neglected.

I currently have about half a dozen secret boards for various works in progress, including the novel I will be working on for NaNoWriMo this year. Just like my novella, I have found having a secret Pinterest board of great help in the planning process. It has helped me to work on my protagonist, as well as establish a time period and location. I have gathered quotes that focus on my protagonist’s state of mind at the beginning of the novel and have a picture I find to be applicable for a book cover. Having a book cover, like a working title, gives you something to focus on while you write your novel as it allows you to keep your theme in mind. Having a secret Pinterest board is a great way to keep you motivated, especially during those times when your enthusiasm starts to wane.

Pinterest has become a popular social network amongst writers and it’s easy to see why. It’s a great addition to researching our stories and provides motivation and an audience at the same time.

Are you on Pinterest? Do you use Pinterest to help research your novels? Do you have secret boards? How do you use Pinterest?

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 Image courtesy of Pixabay

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Time Travel: Would You Go Backwards or Forwards in Time?

back-in-time-rose-1706449_1280If I could travel through time, I wouldn’t hesitate in going back in time; reliving my carefree days as a kid or even venturing to a different time period altogether, just for a day. Personally, I wouldn’t care for travelling forwards in time. Having two kids, I naturally worry for their future and I don’t like the way this planet is heading. Besides, travelling to the future takes all the mystery out of it, and I guess I’ll get there eventually.😉

I’ve always been a sucker for the past. I guess from an early age I continuously romanticised it. Whenever visiting old towns and houses in and around Sydney as a child, I liked to imagine what life was like back then. My childhood fantasies fired my imagination and elicited a life-long interest in history. From the ancients and medieval times to the Victorian era and the 1950s, there were very few periods in history that I didn’t wish to find out more about. I absorbed what the teachers taught us throughout school and I had no hesitation in choosing history subjects at University level as my electives. To travel back in time I hold no illusions though; the days of early medicine before anaesthetics and just being a woman in general was a tough life, but the past fascinates me and we can learn so much from it – there have even been reality television shows based on this very premise.

As a writer, the past has always been an endless source of inspiration for me. Travelling back in time and really living the experience would make the best possible research material for our stories, don’t you think?

If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or the past? Why? Is there a period in history that you like best?

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 Image courtesy of Pixabay

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#IWSG: When Do You Know Your Story Is Ready?

mailbox-808152_1280It’s time once again for this month’s post for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group. A different question is asked each month, where your answers are shared and you encourage others who are struggling. It’s a great way to meet fellow writers, so if you’re interested, you can join here.

A previous question from the IWSG was to discuss our first piece of writing. Unfortunately, I sent my first piece out too soon – back then I had very little knowledge of how the journey to publication worked. These days, I have a better understanding, however now I guess I’m overly-cautious in sending any work out (perfectionism can be a curse). I have a tendency of going over and over my work until I get sick of looking at those particular pieces of writing; case in point are some of my short stories.

frustration

I’ve been sitting on some of these for years; I’ve even had some beta readers look over them for me. Recently I have gone over them again and am now waiting for another round of beta readers to read them. This time, though, I know my short stories are ready as the changes have been minor (sad I can’t say the same about my longer works just yet). Janice Hardy has a helpful post on this very topic, so perhaps that’s a good sign.😉

push-it

Years ago I learned the hard way of sending my work out too soon. As an insecure writer, one of the biggest challenges is letting other people read our work before sending it off into the big, wild world. With persistence and Insecure Writers Support Group Badgehelpful critiques, you’ll know when your story is ready.

When do you know your story is ready? Do you have a tendency of going over your work so many times that you get sick of it? Do you suffer from perfectionism?

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Image courtesy of Pixabay

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Back to the 80s: K is for Kids in the Kitchen.

kids-in-the-kitchenIf I was having a tough time coming up with band names for last month, it’s nothing compared to this months challenge for the letter K. I could only come up with one – yes, one! – that really stood out. And they are once again, another Aussie band.

Kids in the Kitchen were formed in Melbourne in 1983 and their debut single ‘Change in Mood’ reached No.10 in Australia later that same year. The following year, they were nominated for ‘Most Promising New Talent’, as well as ‘Best Debut Single’ at the Countdown Music and Video Awards. In 1985, they released their debut album Shine, where the single ‘Current Stand’ became a hit overseas and reached No.12 in Australia. Their second album, Terrain was released in 1987, which failed to chart. Unfortunately the group could not emulate their earlier success and broke up in 1988.

Other bands formed or who had hits in the 1980s starting with the letter K include:- Kajagoogoo, Kraftwerk, Kool and the Gang.

What other bands of the 1980s that begin with the letter K can you think of?

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Emulating Other Writers

anne-hathaway-in-becoming-janeYears ago when I started taking writing seriously I wanted to emulate a particular author I was reading at the time. By this stage I had done a fair amount of reading and I was doing a couple of writing courses by correspondence. It may sound silly now, but back then I was a Jane Austen wannabe.

In High School, some of my reading involved books such as the Sweet Dreams series (which I bought by the truckload) and borrowing Mills and Boons romances from one of my girlfriends. I was smitten by the ‘love bug’. I began writing my own romances, but I soon abandoned them as my plots were paper thin.

After leaving school, I persisted with the romance genre, despite my poor writing efforts. Romance novels were popular; there must be something I was doing wrong. So I sent away for a tape from Mills and Boon on how to write a romance novel. I went over that tape a number of times; trying to work to their formula, but still I couldn’t master it. It was around this time that I had moved on to different reading material, such as Richard Laymon and Catherine Cookson – I even struggled through Lord of the Rings (and struggle I did, but I eventually made it to the end). I even read the Brontes, re-visited some Stephen King and an old favourite, a gothic romance named Dragonwyk.

I soon discovered I had moved away from being a Jane Austen wannabe. I could never really write a Mills and Boon; there was no ‘passion’ in it for me as a writer (although these days I may still try writing romance – never say never 😉 ).

It took a while, but I found that there’s no harm in emulating other writers when we start out. It helps us to learn our craft through reading; we discover our strengths and weaknesses, our likes and dislikes, our genre or genres, as well as finding our own voice. That’s the time when we need to stop emulating others. Just like there is only one Jane Austen, there is only one you. Let your voice be heard.

Have you found your voice by emulating other writers? Who was your ‘wannabe’ author? Have you tried writing in a genre that just wasn’t really your ‘thing’?

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