Inspiration · Up Close & Personal · Writing

Writing and the Keeping of Secrets.

How good are you at keeping secrets? Some people can hold a secret for weeks or possibly months before feeling the need to tell someone, while others can keep a secret to themselves an entire lifetime.

People keep secrets for a multitude of reasons. Shame, guilt, fear are just some examples. Sometimes we have been hurt so much that we keep it locked away in the back of our minds, trying desperately to block the pain away. Some experts believe that our greatest fear is not death, but humiliation and judgement. We are afraid of being rejected, of being kicked out of the social group. We are afraid of being abandoned. We keep secrets in order to ‘keep the peace’.

Certainly there can be times when we feel that some things are personal and nobody else’s business (hello, social media), but there can also be times when keeping secrets can affect our physical and mental health. We may feel vulnerable if we expose ourselves to others. We don’t open ourselves up and try to seek the help we need. In some cases this may be caused by a lack of trust in others.

Recently, I began thinking about secrets and it suddenly occurred to me that I have been keeping a secret from those closest to me. In fact, when I come to think about it, I don’t think many people know about it all. An event took place in my life a long time ago that I have since buried quite deep, but the memory is still there. Sometimes I see or hear something that reminds me and the memory of it all comes flooding back and it can be incredibly strong.

I guess this is one of the reasons why I turn to writing; I can open myself up and ‘bleed’ upon the page. Writing allows me the freedom to put my thoughts down on paper and express any feelings I may otherwise find difficult. Writing can force you to be honest with yourself. It is believed that for some people, writing can help with the healing process. Even for non-writers, keeping a journal can be good for your mental health, such as depression.

I’m currently working my way through my first novel that I wrote some years ago. It’s one of those stories that keeps coming back to me; that needs to be told simply because the initial spark for this novel has been that ‘little secret’ (and keeping secrets can be a good plot device). It needs quite a bit of work and I know I have been avoiding it for some time. I guess like many of us, I have to face my daemons someday. I guess the time has finally arrived.

Have you got a secret you’ve never shared with anyone? Do you find writing helps you with the healing process? How good are you at keeping secrets? Do you think some things are better left unsaid?

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Image courtesy of Pixabay

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Writing · Writing Process

Keeping a Writer’s Journal.

writersjournalIn recent months, I have begun using a writer’s journal. I was never any good at writing in a diary to talk about the mundane, but I’m finding a writer’s journal different. I might slot in the odd piece of what’s happening in my life occasionally as it could prove helpful for future writing projects, however, I find that keeping a writer’s journal is best for the following reasons:-

It helps with the brainstorming process

Your writing journal may include your dreams, story ideas or blog posts. Whenever you come up with a new idea for a story, article, etc., write it down in your writing journal. It also helps in getting your feelings down on paper, preparing you for certain scenes or projects. Keeping all your ideas together in the one place, rather than scattered on pieces of paper everywhere (been there, done that), is also beneficial.

It helps you to concentrate on your goals

Recently, I had to step back and concentrate on my writing goals. Keeping a writer’s journal helped me with that as I was able to see which projects needed to be tackled first – starting small so that I would gradually work my way up to bigger projects. This then allowed me to concentrate upon my genres, possibly experimenting with other genres and my preferred options for publication.

It helps you to write every day

The old ‘rule’ of writing everyday enables us to form good writing habits. Getting into the routine of writing in a journal a few minutes a day helps us to put pen to paper. I write in my journal every morning over my morning cuppa as mornings are the best time for me to write. It usually only take me a few minutes and I’m done, ready to start my work for the day.

It keeps you away from the computer

Writing longhand is a great way to get you away from the keyboard and being distracted from the internet. It is a quick way of writing down your ideas and gives you the opportunity to write anywhere. Writing longhand also gives you the freedom to make mistakes without having to worry about how it looks, especially if you’re a perfectionist like me. 😉

Do you keep a writer’s journal? What have you been doing to keep up with your goals this year? Were you any good at keeping a diary?

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Image courtesy of Pixabay