Writing

What Is Your Favourite Aspect of Being a Writer?

take-532097_1280There are many good things about being a writer; choosing your own hours, working wherever you want, but my favourite aspect of being a writer has to be telling the stories you need to tell. It’s those voices in your head that tell you what to write, which helps determine what genre/s to write in and how you need to go about telling them. Sure, friends and family tend to give us strange looks or even a wide berth, but we’re fortunate enough not to be considered strange enough to be placed in a padded cell – well, at least not yet, anyway.

minionvoicesIt’s the spark of an idea that comes to you through experience; from something you see, hear or read, through an issue that you feel passionate about. It’s the idea of being able to create people’s lives, places and whole new worlds within our imaginations. Our imagination lights up and fires our creative souls to produce something you hope others will appreciate. In short, it’s the joy of creating something we see in our minds eye and moulding it into shape through the use of words. The best part of being a writer is to give those voices free reign; after all everyone has a story to tell – even those voices within your own head. 😉

Without a doubt I’ll be giving free reign to the voices in my head this month by yet again participating in NaNoWriMo. I’ve been busy doing my preparations, so I’m eager to get started (just don’t expect to see too much of me around here for a while)!

What is your favourite aspect of being a writer? Do you enjoy the writing process? Are you doing NaNoWriMo this year?

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Image courtesy of Pixabay

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Inspiration, This Writer's Life, Up Close & Personal

A Special Place.

A Special PlaceAs a child, my family and I would make regular trips down the south coast of New South Wales. I enjoyed being outside, and despite my fair skin, would spend many hours under the hot, Australian sun.

Back then, the caravan park in which we stayed was basic in its facilities. Toilets were little more than a hole in the ground. We were thankful for electricity, but we cooked on a gas stove until we eventually ‘upgraded’ and installed an old fashioned fuel stove outside. To have a hot shower, one needed to be quick; one needed to place a certain amount of money into a machine to get a hot shower that lasted five minutes. You needed to keep your eye on the clock and have a steady supply of loose change.

Campers could camp anywhere, and our caravan was perfectly situated directly opposite the beach. It was not uncommon to spend the morning at the beach, go back ‘home’ when you were hungry and then back to the beach again.

To break this monotony, my sisters and I would go for walks with our mother, either exploring rock pools or go on bush walks. It was here that I discovered the wonders of the Australian bush. One regular spot we would visit was a magical place for me. The trees were so tall and closely compacted, that it allowed very little sunlight to filter through. Images of Hansel and Gretel or strange beasts lurking further amongst the shadows entered my mind. We would always stop at one particular place and turn back, yet I always wondered what lay beyond in the distance, where the darkness seemed to go on indefinitely. The atmosphere and the silence fueled my imagination and I was always disappointed to turn back towards civilisation.

On the drive back to our true home in suburban Sydney, we would pass acres of farmland, and I could never decide where I wanted to live; country, bush or beach. I have since lived in the bush of the Blue Mountains and currently reside in the country (my last home the beach?), but there has always been the certainty that being out with nature is my special place. As a writer I enjoy the silence, being alone with my thoughts and my muse. Over the years I have discovered that setting and sense of place is important to my stories. These days, whenever I need to feel inspired, I just have to walk out my back door.

Do you have a special place? Do you enjoy the outdoors; maybe even ‘roughing it’? If you’re a writer, what do you do to find your ‘muse’? What do you prefer – the bush, the beach or the country?

Image by Debbie Johansson