Movies/Television, My Books

The Romance of ‘The Ghost and Mrs. Muir’ (1947), plus Ghostly Reads.

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir has always been one of my favourite movies. A romance with a ghost— what’s not to love? And with Valentine’s Day upon us, February is the perfect time to watch it.

If you’re unaware of the plot, the story involves Mrs. Lucy Muir, a widow with a young daughter. She decides to move into a seaside cottage, despite being told that it has a ghost. In fact, she rather relishes the idea! She encounters the ghost of a former sea captain, Daniel Gregg, and soon become friends.

One of the things I’ve always liked about this film is the banter between the two main characters, which demonstrates their growing relationship. Daniel Gregg (Rex Harrison) even has a special name for Lucy Muir, which I think is rather sweet. Rex Harrison and Gene Tierney are perfectly suited in the roles, and it would have to be my favourite film of Rex Harrison’s. Seeing George Sanders in the role of Miles Fairly (children’s author ‘Uncle Neddy’) always felt appropriate to me. He played the role of Jack Favell in Rebecca (1940), so he plays a charming rake very well. It’s great to see a young Natalie Wood as Anna, and I enjoy her performance, although her American accent does stand out amongst the English setting.

The music and lighting help adds to the atmosphere and gives it a sense of place. The special effects are deftly done, blending in well, and do not detract from the story. Although sometimes, I can’t help but look at the seagulls outside the bedroom window!

My favourite romantic ghost story, I had to get my own copy.

I really like the sets, especially ‘Gull Cottage’, where the story mainly takes place. It makes me wistful for a seaside cottage of my own. I also like the set of the lavishly appointed home of Miles Fairly and wish there were more scenes shot here (yes, I’m a hopeless romantic and a sticky-beak 😉).

The most heart-breaking scene of the film is where Daniel Gregg (Rex Harrison) leaves, saying goodbye to Lucy as she sleeps. It’s such a touching scene and beautifully done.

The ending, although sad, is to be expected, but it is also a happy ending, of sorts.

If you’re looking for a romantic movie with a difference this Valentine’s Day (or any day, for that matter), I highly recommend this film.

Are you looking for a ghostly read this February?

Speaking of ghosts, are you interested in a ghostly read?

This month, I’ve partnered with other authors to bring you some spooky reads. The collection is a mix of genres, including mystery, romance, fantasy, and horror. All with a ghost (or two), so there’s something for everyone.

Both my short stories The Ghost at Willow Creek and First Christmas are also on the list!

Just click on this link for details – Ghostly February

Looking for more spooky stories? Subscribe to my newsletter for regular updates and receive an exclusive flash fiction. I’d love it if you could join the discussion! 🙂

Movies/Television

The Allure of ‘My Cousin Rachel’.

Some years ago, I listened to the audiobook of ‘My Cousin Rachel’, and like her previous work, I was drawn into Daphne du Maurier’s world. As Olivia de Havilland celebrated her 104th birthday this month, I felt it appropriate to watch one of her films.

One of the things that drew me in straight away was seeing Richard Burton as Philip Ashley, which was his first Hollywood role. I’ve always liked Richard Burton and absolutely love his voice and he does well in this role. He plays a convincing angry, tormented, even obsessed character which shifts from revenge to love and back again. Olivia de Havilland portrays a friendly, charming widow, where on occasion, the audience sees another side to her, leaving one to question if she is all she appears to be.

Suspicious of his cousin, Philip enters Rachel’s bedroom, searching her drawers for evidence. Here he discovers seeds. Sadly, though, I think more could have been made leading up to this discovery. Perhaps the hints were too subtle, like when Rachel makes tea. Other than the mention of a tree in Italy in passing towards the end of the film, there is no indication of Rachel’s interest in botany or of laburnum and its poison.

I was impressed with both the film’s costumes and set design. The sets include a couple of scenes in Italy, but mainly those of Ashley House in Cornwall. The architecture within Ashley House, with its timber and stonework, give it a very Gothic atmosphere.

Overall, though, my takeaway from the entire film was Richard Burton’s performance. Perhaps it may also have to do with the fact that he is the main character and the story is told from his point of view. We see his anger and mistrust turn into an obsession so that at times he verges on madness.

This 1952 film version is a good adaptation of the novel, filled with atmosphere and suspense. I just think more could have been made of the possibility of poison to further heighten the suspicion towards Rachel for the viewer, as it had done for Philip Ashley.

Do you enjoy watching old movies? What have you been watching this month? Have world events inspired you to watch something lighter or has it made little difference to your viewing habits?

Movies/Television

Revisiting the film ‘Rebecca’.

A few months ago, I listened to the audiobook of Rebecca, which was the perfect excuse to watch the 1940 film version all over again. This film introduced me to the book when I was a kid and has been one of my favourites ever since.

The film stays reasonably close to the book, where the young, nameless protagonist marries Maxim de Winter, owner of Manderley. Here she is witness to constant reminders of Rebecca, his former wife so that she believes Maxim is still in love with her. The constant reminder of his first wife is strengthened by the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers. Played by Judith Anderson, she does a brilliant job of portraying a cold, vindictive, and jealous character. Mrs. Danvers is loyal to Rebecca, almost to the point of obsession.

This obsession is revealed in its full glory during the scene where Mrs. Danvers shows the new Mrs de Winter around Rebecca’s bedroom for the first time. The room has not changed since the day Rebecca died and is immaculate. The curtains, the furniture, even down to the embroidery, it truly is a beautiful room. Like many of the other sets, a lot of work went into making this one. So much so, I wouldn’t have minded a room like that myself. 😉

Joan Fontaine does a great job as the shy, tormented Mrs de Winter and Laurence Oliver also portrays a convincing Maxim de Winter. Perhaps it was due to his portrayal that I have always seen Maxim and the new Mrs de Winter in a father/daughter relationship, rather than any great romance.

The suspense in this film has a slow, gradual build, heightening the tension and the mystery surrounding Rebecca. You do not see any images of her, but one does not have to because the characters help to build a picture in the viewers’ minds, adding to the suspense. This is what Alfred Hitchcock excelled at.

The special effects are of-course dated, but it still helps with the overall mood of the film, especially when it comes to Manderley itself. Despite this, I think the film is a masterpiece of the Gothic genre and one of Hitchcock’s greatest works.

What have you been watching this month? Have you been re-visiting some old favourites?