Book Promotion, Writing

New Writers: Are You Worried about Marketing?

book daisiesRecently, I read a blog post on marketing for writers, which stated: ‘Experts agree – especially for self-publishing – that marketing thoughts should come before writing’. Okaay. Sure, this sounds reasonable advice for non-fiction writers, but not so much for those of us who write fiction (I later discovered this is pretty much what those ‘experts’ were really referring to). Thinking of marketing before or even while we write can kill our creativity.

When you read statements like these and that you should treat your writing like a business, it can stop you in your tracks. There is a lot to being a writer these days and it can become overwhelming for us new, unpublished writers, when we read things like that. We can get blindsided. This has happened to me lately and it has held me back from even getting stared (yes, I admit, I can tend to be a bit anally retentive when it comes to being organised). This then brings in the self-doubt and you end up going nowhere. Thinking too much about marketing before you’ve even written anything is just putting the cart before the horse.

Admittedly, there is a lot of the information out there about what is expected of writers once we’re published or those who are about to be published, but for us newbies, it’s best to stick to the basics. It’s good to be informed and have some knowledge of what’s in store for us on our writing journey, but there comes a time when we need to stop and remember why we’re doing all this in the first place – our writing. Without that, there is no point to thinking about marketing. When speaking to my husband recently he said the same thing – there’s no reason to think about that unless you have something out there. Do the writing first; then worry about all the rest later. From what I have been reading lately, more and more writers agree that the best marketing plan is to write more books.

Sure it’s good to be organised and to make plans for the future, but sometimes when we linger upon those things for too long, it can zap us of our energy and take away our enjoyment in the writing process. Yes, it’s good to keep a blog and be on some social networks in order to network with other writers and build a community, but our writing should be our number one priority. We should be writing because it gives us pleasure. So don’t rush – good things come to those who wait.

Are you unpublished and get overwhelmed by what is expected of writers these days? Do you think too much information can be a bad thing? As a new writer, do you find social media a help or a hindrance? Do you disagree entirely? Do you prefer not to let such things worry you?

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Book Promotion, Writing

Beginner’s Tips on Promoting Your Book.

Recently, my writers group at the Central West Writers’ Centre was visited by Vanessa Talbot, author of Extraordinary You.  Vanessa is also a life coach, helping other writers and she discussed various ways on how to promote yourself when you become an author.  Here’s what Vanessa had to say:-

  • Writers just want to write – they’re usually insular people.
  • Most self-published authors sell about 100 books.
  • Authors need to be pro-active in marketing their books.
  • The fastest way to sell a book is by word of mouth.
  • Learn to build a rapour with the media.
  • When marketing your book, start with local media – print and radio, then move on to magazines.
  • When being interviewed, match your tone with the subject of your book.
  • Match your energy level with the radio/television host.
  • Eye contact is not necessarily a rapour builder – soften eye contact.
  • Match the tone and pace of your voice with the interviewer, so you’re on the same scale.
  • You need to match the language used with the show – listen to/watch shows to help you.
  • People are drawn to mirror images of themselves.
  • Find common interests with your interviewer.
  • Be careful of your rapour within author photos – body language can be a good giveaway!
  • Get the media on your side and be a gracious guest.  Send email, etc to show your appreciation – they’re sure to remember you that way as well.
  • Finally, create a blog and join social networks such as Facebook and Twitter – get yourself out there!

Many thanks to Vanessa Talbot and the Central West Writers’ Centre – we’ll certainly take more notice of people’s body language from now on!

Have you ever been interviewed?  What was the experience like for you?

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